inside

inside #96 out now!

May 16, 2017
  • Article by Online Editor

Welcome to the second iteration of inside for this year and an updated look for our magazine. We hope that you like the clean lines of the layouts and the new typeface that is contemporary yet elegant – all that exemplifies the ideals of inside.

In this issue, many of the articles highlight innovation and a coming together of designers from different genres to create, via a blurring between tradition and contemporary practice. This was seen in Melbourne recently at the inaugural Melbourne Design Week, which we cover in this magazine. Its success was due to the passion of designers who joined together to reinvent ideas and push the boundaries of creativity.

The Melbourne Art Book Fair 2017 in the Great Hall of the National Gallery of Victoria, which was part of Melbourne Design Week. Photo by Wayne Taylor.
The Melbourne Art Book Fair 2017 in the Great Hall of the National Gallery of Victoria, which was part of Melbourne Design Week. Photo by Wayne Taylor.

Our review of the British Rising Talents at MAISON&OBJET Paris highlights the multidisciplinarian talents of six designers who are also thinking outside the design box, using materials and technology to make something fresh and new.

We profile Koichi Takada to better understand the balance of aesthetics that has become his trademark, and talk to PTID about the practice’s many projects, which embrace the spectrum of design. In Adelaide, we talk with Andrew Wallace, who is a passionate educator and visionary when it comes to the interaction of urban and interior design; while in Sydney we showcase the beautiful garden home of architect Paul Brace from Popov Bass Architects.

Koichi Takada.
Koichi Takada.

Projects in this issue are the embodiment of sophistication, innovation and beauty. In Melbourne, Sibling Architecture’s Monash University Biomedical Discovery Institute is indeed a real discovery in terms of a radical interior design for student learning, while Melbourne Museum’s Pauline Gandel Children’s Gallery celebrates the child and the fine collaborative work of the Museum’s
Victoria Design Studio. Here play, learning and interactive technology present an interior that sets
a new benchmark in design for a children’s area.

A sensitive design for the Extruded cottage by Brisbane studio Myers Ellyett is the epitome
of calm, cool and collected. In Los Angeles a majestic residential project from Rios Clementi
Hale Studios brings a classic piece of mid-century architecture in line with contemporary living, while returning the original splendour.

Extruded Cottage by Myers Ellyett. Photo by Cathy Schusler.
Extruded Cottage by Myers Ellyett. Photo by Cathy Schusler.

Auvers by Matt Woods Design in Sydney is refined and impressive, creating an atmosphere that truly enhances the act of drinking coffee at any time of the day, and in Hong Kong, bling French style is definitely on the menu at 12000 Francs, a new wine bar and café on the Island.

Each of the projects showcased in issue #96 is special for its innovation, attention to detail and
a pushing of the boundaries of design for the interior, while the featured practitioners provide an insight into their own very special world. Enlightening and exhilarating, but, best of all, it’s happening now. Until next time.

– Jan and Gillian, co-editors, inside

inside

Lead image: 12000 Francs by Emma Maxwell Design, which is featured on the cover of this issue. Photo by Edmond Leong.

inside #96 is available now through newsstands and digitally through Zinio.

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