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“Community focused” Victorian winners of the AIA Awards announced

July 1, 2016

The winners of the Victorian Chapter of the AIA Awards have been announced, with ARM Architecture taking out four awards – including a sixth Victorian Medal – for the Geelong Library & Heritage Centre. “It has elevated the role of public architecture for both Geelong and the wider regional community,” Hamish Lyon, Chair of Juries said.

Above: Geelong Library & Heritage Centre by ARM Architecture, photo by Emma Cross.

The winners of the Victorian Chapter of the AIA Awards have been announced, with the juries noting that a focus on community was evident in all categories, cleverly showcasing architecture’s ability to contribute to the public realm in a variety of positive and innovative ways.

2016 Institute Gold Medallists, ARM Architecture, were awarded their unprecedented sixth Victorian Medal for the Geelong Library & Heritage Centre, which also took home the Regional Prize and both the Interior Architecture: Marion Mahoney Award and Public Architecture: William Wardell Awards. Hamish Lyon, Chair of Juries described it as “an exemplar public project and a significant new landmark for the City of Geelong. A striking piece of architecture and major community hub, it has elevated the role of public architecture for both Geelong and the wider regional community.”

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Geelong Library & Heritage Centre by ARM Architecture, photo by John Gollings.

 

The theme of community was also evident in the Residential Architecture categories. Mel Bright, Residential Architecture Houses – New Jury Chair said she was “encouraged that architects are pushing their clients to understand that their private house is more than just real estate and quantity of bedrooms. There is a role to play in the greater context and that, even at the scale of a private home, there is opportunity for the project to make a positive contribution to its place and to local communities.”

The Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Harold Desbrowe-Annear Award was presented to Kennedy Nolan for the Deepdene House, while Austin Maynard Architects’ THAT House and NMBW Architecture Studio’s Point Lonsdale House both won the Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Architecture Award. 

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The Deepdene House by Kennedy Nolan, photo by Derek Swalwell.

 

Austin Maynard Architects won again in the Residential Architecture – Houses (Alterations and Additions): John and Phyllis Murphy Award for its project, Mills, The Toy Management House. The home also won the Interior Architecture: Architecture Award. The Residential Architecture – Houses (Multiple Housing): Best Overend Award was awarded to McBride Charles Ryan for the Monash University Logan Hall.

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The Monash University Logan Hall by McBride Charles Ryan, photo by John Gollings.

 

Six Degrees Architects won both the Commercial Architecture: Architecture Award as well as the Sustainable Architecture: Allan and Beth Coldicutt Award for 3-5 Jessie Street, Cremorne, and Western Business Accelerator and Centre for Excellence (BACE) respectively. Meanwhile, the Commercial Architecture: Sir Osborn McCutcheon Award was won by The Buchan Group and Wonderwall for their work on Melbourne’s Emporium.

Western Business Accelerator and Centre for Excellence (BACE) by

Western Business Accelerator and Centre for Excellence (BACE) by Six Degrees Architects, photo by Alice Hutchison.

 

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Emporium Melbourne by The Buchan Group and Wonderwall, photo by Aaron Pocock.

 

The 2016 Enduring Architecture Award was awarded to Heide II, originally designed by the late Neil Everist and David McGlashan of McGlashan Everist in 1963. The clients desired a “gallery to be lived in,” intending for the house to one day be transformed into a public art gallery. This vision is now a reality with the creation of the major cultural institution – Heide Museum of Modern Art. The extended museum facilities, garden walks and sculpture-park now offer a genuine community place in the midst of Melbourne’s growing suburban landscape.

See the full list of winners here.

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