Sean’s Kitchen brings vintage New York to Adelaide

May 29, 2015

Sydney-based design firm Alexander & Co worked closely with well-known chef Sean Connolly to create a space that transports clientele from a heritage-listed Adelaide railway station to 1920s New York.

Photography by Murray Fredericks.

Sydney-based design firm Alexander & Co worked closely with well-known chef Sean Connolly to create a space that transports clientele back to a New York and a world long forgotten. Alexander & Co sought to create a space that oozed style through a modern interpretation of a 1920’s New York brasserie. Sean’s Kitchen is located in the North Terrace of the heritage-listed Adelaide Railway Station. “It is our re-imagining of a lost New York Cityscape, a forgotten time when above all else quality was the cornerstone of experience,” say designers Alexander & Co.

Lighting the double height space and maintaining intimacy was crucial to the dining experience and was achieved through the use of joinery mounted lighting, suspended pendant lighting and concealed lighting strips to enhance the atmosphere and help to create a sense of opulence and grandness.

The space was divided into two distinct areas, offering patrons two very different Gatsby-esque dining experiences. The dining galleria known as “The Marketplace” is reminiscent of a la carte Central Park dining. Featuring timber park benches, wooden tables and custom brass joinery mounted floor lamps reminiscent of vintage streetlights. There is also a museum of ham located on the mezzanine that is a quirky and unique nod to Manhattan’s Meat Packing District, marble topped bars, oxidised metal cladding and classic lead light balustrades are all reminiscent of old world New York glamour.

Accompanying this is a grand private dining room on the mezzanine level referred to as “The Distillery.” Constructed around a custom double-sided leather clad banquette seat, with black marble mosaic tiles and blackened steel, the Distillery is luxurious and full of character. A backlit wine display at one end and a solid walnut bar at the other add drama and emphasise the decorative barrel vaulted ceiling. The space is intimately lit via a suspended ring of light and an integrated skirting light adds texture by illuminating the timber floor.

Sean’s Kitchen is sure to captivate patrons, and make us wish we could be transported back to that time for longer than it takes to enjoy our meals.

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