Market Lane, Carlton

January 22, 2013

Market Lane’s new Carlton space builds on the homeliness of its setting – injecting liveliness & community interaction to the former house.

Moving in next door to the ever popular Baker D. Chirico in Carlton, Market Lane’s new Faraday Street premises builds on the inherent homeliness of its setting – formerly a traditional Victorian dwelling – infusing function, liveliness and and community interaction through its considered interior setup.

Designed by Sarah Trotter of Melbourne design practice Hearth, this is the third location for the well-respected coffee roastery and cafe – with each different interior playing to the strengths of its unique situation.

“Each Market Lane store has a different response to its site,” says Trotter. “The Prahran roastery is quite industrial, adjacent to the market, and Therry Street responds to the utilitarian history of its old factory site. Faraday Street had a completely different set of challenges.”

Perhaps the feature of the space is the existing window, transformed by a simple folded steel plate (removed at night) into a service area to customers and aperture to passers-by. Not only does the window provide both signage and light, but it also offers the community a visual connection to the space.

“We tried to keep things generous and open at Faraday Street, so that baristas aren’t crammed into the space and nor is the customer, despite its small size,” says Trotter.

Inside, the main counter serves all the purposes you’d expect it to at a busy cafe, with the espresso machine and surrounding retail display of coffee-related products taking centre stage. What’s interesting about the setup is its feeling of permanence, despite its ability to be easily deconstructed.

Retaining the regal marble on the mantle, old layers of paint and lovingly worn floor, minimal detailing and American Oak fittings respond to the room’s surrounds and juxtapose these existing textures. Materials and fixtures are largely re-worked second-hand or vintage pieces.

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