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FMD Architects presents Jack’s House

March 11, 2014

The new extension of the house negotiates between two buildings of different eras and allows the old house to open itself up to natural light and ventilation and provide a large open plan living and dining area.

Photography: Shannon McGrath

The new extension of Jack’s House offers a dialogue between two buildings of different eras. The existing Victorian residence at the street front and the industrial saw-tooth warehouse on the rear boundary seem disconnected in style and function. The extension negotiates between the two buildings, stretching and tapering toward the saw-tooth brick wall, while internally opening up from the double loaded Victorian corridor to the open glazed space, with the brick wall on the boundary as a feature backdrop.

The existing residence was reworked to incorporate three bedrooms and a fourth flexible space. The bathroom was re-planned as an en-suite and a new combined laundry/bathroom included within the existing house. The kitchen was reduced in size to provide space for the new laundry/bath and the new extension offering a large open space with access to east and north light as well as natural cross ventilation. The house has successfully transitioned from a couple with no children to a fourth person family, with spaces being reused according to their changing needs.

The interior detailing transitions from the Victorian detail to the modern plywood detailing as you progress into the spaces. Re-planning of the existing interior allowed the floor plan to improve its efficiency, thus ensuring the footprint of the new extension was minimised and the garden maximised. The existing street frontage was maintained without alteration, in keeping with the local character of hidden extensions to the rear of existing houses.

The extension allows the Victorian house to open itself up to natural light and ventilation and provide a large open plan living and dining area. The kitchen is also renovated and repositioned to improve its connection with the garden.

www.fmdarchitects.com.au

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