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Architecture: Blacktown Olympic Park AFL & Cricket Grandstand

March 18, 2010

DesignInc’s stadium design provides a 1500-seat grandstand and support facilities for a new AFL and cricket venue in Blacktown, NSW.

This $30 million project comprises a new 1500-seat grandstand and a 250-seat function room and kitchen, with three buildings providing facilities for two ovals. Facilities include players’ rooms, media offices, an indoor practice area. With a scale similar to that of the MCG, the new grandstand can be expanded in the future to bring capacity to 20,000 seats.

The project features an uncomplicated group of three white buildings, each of which have been treated with a slightly different approach to wrapping and enclosure. The stadium envelops the perimeter of Oval 1, folding down over the three levels and the pedestrian circulation concourse before folding over the main entry arch and kitchen for the function room. The folds in the roof reveal the yellow, grey and white panels that define the active public areas.

The roof over the Indoor Practice Area covers the north and south ends, terminating at a low awning on the public side of the forecourt. The east wall, facing the stadium, is clad in translucent polycarbonate walls – letting in abundant natural light during the day and allowing the building to glow like a decorated shed at night. It is naturally ventilated through the perimeter walls and the pop up clerestory skylights.

The third building, providing amenities for Oval 2, consists of two smaller structures. Roofs resembling gull wings float above the masonry enclosures, with continuous high-level windows. Poles beside the forecourt hold banners for ticket sales, highlighting the function of the building, while the entry gates are lined with yellow panels completing the theme of the venue.

On-side storm water management is in place, while the use of natural light is encouraged inside. Photovoltaic panels generate power, with natural ventilation reducing dependence on air conditioning.

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