Architecture

State by state: AIA award winners announced

June 29, 2016

ADR recaps the big winners of the state awards in Queensland, ACT, Tasmania and the Northern Territory, with Cox Architecture, Lahznimmo Architects, Cumulus Studio and Hames Sharley among this year’s celebrated practices.

Above: Westside Action by Cox Architecture won the Sustainable Architecture Award, photo by Rodrigo Vargas.

QUEENSLAND

The Griffith University Student Guild Uni Bar and Link Refurbishment by Push won the Commercial Architecture: Beatrice Hutton Award, while the TAS Science Facility by Charles Wright Architects won the Educational Architecture: Jennifer Taylor Award.

Push ArchitectsGrifith University Studnet Union facilities

Griffith University Student Guild Uni Bar and Link Refurbishment by Push, photo by Eason Creative.

 

Owen Architecture scooped up two awards for the night, including the Residetial Architecture – Houses (New): Robin Dods Award for Rosalie House, and the Heritage: Don Roderick Award for the Bayside Fire Station.

Rosalie House by Owen Architecture, photo by Toby Scott.

Rosalie House by Owen Architecture, photo by Toby Scott.

 

University of Queensland Oral Health Centre by Cox Rayner Architects with Hames Sharley and Conrad Gargett Riddel was a big winner on the night receiving the F D G Stanley Award for Public Architecture, an Award for Interior Architecture and an Award for Sustainable Architecture.

Push ArchitectsBrighton Twin sets

Brighton Twin Set by Push won the Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing: Job & Froud Award, photo by Eason Creative.

 

A duplex created from a culturally significant, architectural ruin of four flats in Highgate Hill won the Job & Froud Award for Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing.

Sustainable-Architecture_Harry-Marks-Award_Project-Zero_BVN_Photo-Christopher-Frederick-Jones

Project Zero by BVN won the Sustainable Architecture: Harry Marks Award, photo by Christopher Frederick Jones.

 

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

The ACT’s top honour, the Canberra Medallion, was awarded to the Bowen Place Crossing by Lahznimmo Architects in addition to the Sir John Overall Award for Urban Design.

Bowen Place Crossing by Lahznimmo Architects, photo by Brett Boardman.

Bowen Place Crossing by Lahznimmo Architects, photo by Brett Boardman.

 

Canberra’s new Airport Hotel by Bates Smart collected several accolades including an Award for Commercial Architecture, Award for Interior Architecture and the Light in Architecture Prize.

48 Macquarie Street by Guida Moseley Brown Architects also won the Commercial Architecture Award, photo by Rodrigo Vargas.

48 Macquarie Street by Guida Moseley Brown Architects also won the Commercial Architecture Award, photo by Rodrigo Vargas.

 

King House, ‘an exceptionally clever house that maximises amenity and functionality on a tight site with a tight budget,’ by Cox Architecture won the Malcolm Moir and Heather Sutherland Award for Residential Architecture – Houses (New).

King House by Cox Architecture won the Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Malcolm Moir and Heather Sutherland Award, photo by Ben Wrigley.

King House by Cox Architecture, photo by Ben Wrigley.

 

Residential Multiple Housing_Award_Common Ground Housing_Collins Caddaye Architects_StefanPostles

Common Ground Housing by Collins Caddaye Architects won the Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing Award, photo by Stefan Postles.

 

HDR | Rice Daubney won two awards – the Educational Architecture Award for both the Australian Defence Force Academy’s Auditorium, and the ADF’s New Indoor Sports Centre. Also taking out two awards was francis-jones more hen thorp, who won the Interior Architecture: W Hayward Award for the Ben Chifley Building, and the Commercial Architecture Award, for the same project.

Sustainable Architecture_Award_Westside Acton_Cox Architecture_RodrigoVargas

Westside Action by Cox Architecture won the Sustainable Architecture Award, photo by Rodrigo Vargas.

 

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Community engagement was a strong theme across the winning projects for the NT, particularly the overall winner of the night, Anbinik Kakadu Resort by Troppo Architects which received the Tracy Memorial Award and the Peter Dermoudy Award for Commercial Architecture. Meanwhile, Charles Darwin Centre by dwp|suters + Pei Cobb Freed won the Commercial Architecture Award.

Commercial_AnbinikKakadu_Troppo_PhotoDavidHaigh

Anbinik Kakadu Resort by Troppo Architects, photo by David Haigh.

 

The Michael Long Learning & Leadership Centre by Hames Sharley, another example of a project focused on community benefit, received the Indigenous Community Award and an Award for Educational Architecture.

Educational_MichaelLongCentre_HamesSharley_PhotoStudioMcnaught

Michael Long Learning & Leadership Centre by Hames Sharley, photo by Hames Sharley.

 

The iconic 1984 Raffles Plaza by Graeme Whitford for KROMA was recognised with the Enduring Architecture Award, as a trail blazing multi-residential development in the Territory. The Public Architecture Award and the COLORBOND® Award for Steel Architecture were won by the Menzies School of Health Research Royal Darwin Hospital, designed by Hames Sharley.

Public_MenziesSchoolOfHealthResearch_HamesSharley_PhotoStudioMcnaught

Menzies School of Health Research Royal Darwin Hospital by Hames Sharley, photo by Studio Mcnaught.

 

Charles Darwin University Trade Training Centre by MODE won the Sustainable Architecture Award, photo by Shaana Mcnaught.

Charles Darwin University Trade Training Centre by MODE won the Sustainable Architecture Award, photo by Shaana Mcnaught.

 

TASMANIA

Devil’s Corner by Cumulus Studio won two awards – both the Colin Philip Award for Commercial Architecture and the COLORBOND Award for Steel Architecture. 1+2 Architecture also picked up two awards, winning the Commercial Architecture Award and the Interior Architecture Award for their project, Stornoway.

2016070571_DevilsCorner_CumulusStudio_TanjaMilbourne_0

Devil’s Corner by Cumulus Studio, photo by Tanja Milbourne.

 

On the residential front, Jenny’s House by Rosevear Stephenson won both the Heritage: Roy Sharrington Award and the Residential Architecture – Houses (Alterations and Additions): Tasmanian Chapter Named Award. The Houses (Alterations and Additions) Award was won by Gaetano Palmese Architects for Sofia & Otto’s Playground.

2016070993_FiveYardsHouse_Archier_AdamGibson_0

The Five Yards House by Archier won the Residential Architecture – Houses (New): Esmond Dorney Award as well as the Sustainable Architecture Award, photo by Adam Gibson.

 

Preston Lane was the recipient of the Educational Architecture: Tasmanian Chapter Named Award for the UTAS Student Lounge on the Sandy Bay campus, while the Clarence High School Sports Pavilion won Dock 4 Architects the Public Architecture: Alan C Walker Award.

2016070935_TrinityHill.etal_HbvArchitects.etal_StevenSpizick_2

Trinity Hill by HBV Architects with Carroll and Cockburn Architects won the Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing Award, photo by Steven Spizick.

 

For a full list of the state’s award winners, visit the AIA website.

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